Which Posts Get the Most Engagement on LinkedIn?

Do you want to increase visibility and engagement with your LinkedIn posts?

Hi, it’s Allison Shields from Legal Ease Consulting where I help lawyers build the practices they want and attract their ideal clients using tools like LinkedIn. In my last couple of videos, I talked about using hashtags and mentioning connections as two ways you can increase visibility and engagement for your LinkedIn posts.

Today, let’s talk about how you can use the format of your posts to encourage engagement.

              Text: Believe it or not, experts say that solely text-based posts still get more engagement on LinkedIn than posts that are not text-based. In other words, you can get engagement even without any fancy equipment or searching high and low for an appropriate image. To make your text posts even more engaging, you might consider asking your audience a question in your post, and encouraging your audience to respond by commenting.

              Video: The number two type of post on LinkedIn right now is video – video is hot everywhere. Of course, if you’re a Videosocials member, creating video and posting it on LinkedIn is easy. But what if you’re camera shy? (you can still use videosocials’ feature and just pull the audio) You can create a simple video using readily available tools like PowerPoint and then add a voiceover timed to the slides to create a quick and easy video.

              Images and PDFS: Posts with images, or posts that contain PDFs, take up more room in the Feed than text-only posts, and for scrollers, these kinds of posts can be attention-getting, but they can also serve as a way to show, rather than simply tell, what you do, who you do it for, and where your expertise lies.

Again, I’m Allison Shields from Legal Ease Consulting, For more LinkedIn video tips, visit my website at LawyerMeltdown.com and look for my forthcoming book, Make LinkedIn Work for You, A Practical Handbook for Lawyers and Other Legal Professionals.

Mention Connections to Get Attention on LinkedIn

In this video in my LinkedIn series, I talk about mentioning or tagging connections as a way to boost visibility and get some additional engagement from your posts.

Hi, I’m Allison Shields from Legal Ease Consulting, Inc., and in today I want to talk about another way to increase engagement with your posts on LinkedIn.

In my last video, I talked about hashtags. Hashtags can help increase visibility and engagement on LinkedIn with users who use hashtags to search for content or who follow hashtags for content that they are interested in on LinkedIn.

But what if your audience doesn’t actively search for content like that on LinkedIn? Or what if you are sharing something on LinkedIn that’s particularly relevant to a specific connection or group of connections? That’s where you can use mentions or tags for connections in your posts on LinkedIn.

To do that, simply type the @ symbol, followed by the person’s name within your post on LinkedIn. Once you start typing, LinkedIn will create suggestions and you can simply click on the correct one.  

When you tag or mention a connection in a post, they’ll receive a notification on the desktop and mobile versions if they have those notifications enabled, and they will receive an email from LinkedIn telling them that you mentioned them in the post, and including a link so they can easily navigate to the post. Mentioning or tagging specific connections makes it more likely that they’ll want to check out a post and possibly like, comment on or share it with their network.

There are two ways to use tags or mentions in your LinkedIn posts. The first way is by mentioning the person’s name within the body of a LinkedIn post itself. For example, I might mention my co-author in the body of a post I write on LinkedIn about our upcoming book, saying something like, “My co-author @DennisKennedy and I are pleased to announce the release of our new book, Make LinkedIn Work for You.” In that post, I’m talking specifically about Dennis, and his name is within the content of the post itself.

But you can also tag your connections at the end of a post to draw their attention to the post even if you don’t mention them within the substantive portion of the post itself. For example, when I post this video on LinkedIn, I might tag Dennis so that he sees I’ve posted a video about LinkedIn, hoping that he’ll share the post with his audience, comment on it, etc. since it’s relevant to the work we do together and to our book.

And that’s an important point – when you are tagging or mentioning a connection in a post on LinkedIn, make sure that post is relevant to them. And don’t over-use mentions or tags. Don’t keep mentioning the same connection over and over because you might end up annoying them. And don’t mention 50 different in the same post, because it may dilute the impact of the mention.

The next time you’re creating a post on LinkedIn, consider which of your connections might benefit most from reading that post, and consider tagging or mentioning them.

Again, I’m Allison Shields from Legal Ease Consulting. Look for my other videos on lawyermeltdown.com.

Increase Post Visibility on LinkedIn with Hashtags

One way to get more visibility and engagement from your LinkedIn post is by using hashtags (#).

Do you want to get more visibility and more engagement from your LinkedIn posts?

Hi, I’m Allison Shields from Legal Ease Consulting, Inc., where I help lawyers build the kinds of practices they want and attract their ideal clients using tools like LinkedIn.

In my last two videos, I talked about what to post on LinkedIn whether you create your own content or simply share content created by others. But either way, all of your Connections on LinkedIn are not going to see all of your posts. The more engagement (likes, comments and shares) a post receives, the more visibility it gets, and the more visibility it gets, the more chance there is for engagement.

In my next few videos, I’ll show you a few methods you can use to increase engagement with your posts on LinkedIn. Today, we’re going to talk about hashtags.

You’re probably familiar with hashtags from other social media platforms like Twitter or Instagram, but hashtags are relatively new on LinkedIn. And LinkedIn has really embraced hashtags. For example, when you start typing a post, LinkedIn will suggest hashtags to add to the post based on the content of that post. LinkedIn users can also choose to follow hashtags or they can search for hashtags. That means that if you use hashtags in your posts, you’ll increase the visibility of those posts.

But don’t go overboard using too many hashtags on each post. I recommend using no more than three per post. And put your most important hashtag first.

If you’re not sure which hashtags to include in your post, you can find them by searching for popular hashtags on LinkedIn, or look at the Profiles of industry leaders in your industry or your target audience and look at the skills, interests, and keywords that are on their Profiles and use them to create your hashtags.

Again, I’m Allison Shields from Legal Ease Consulting. Visit my website at lawyermeltdown.com for more videos like this and for information about my soon to be released book, Make LinkedIn Work for You, written with my co-author, Dennis Kennedy, especially for lawyers and other legal professionals.

What to Post on LinkedIn (Part 2)

In my last video, I talked about what to post on LinkedIn if you are a content creator – if you have a blog, write articles, do presentations, etc. But what if you aren’t a content creator? Never fear – there are still plenty of ways for you to post on LinkedIn.

The truth is, you don’t have to have your own content to be successful on LinkedIn. Every single day, other people are creating content for you that you can use to educate, inform, or entertain your target audience on LinkedIn.

Think about it: very few lawyers create new laws or completely novel arguments. Lawyers are experts at finding information relevant to their client’s case or transaction, and analyzing that information to persuade a judge, a jury, opposing parties or other participants in a transaction. You can do the same thing on LinkedIn by simply finding information that would be useful to your clients or referral sources – and that information doesn’t always have to be strictly about the law.

The lawyers who use LinkedIn the most effectively are not the lawyers who are always talking about themselves or their cases – they are the lawyers who are providing information their audience can actually USE. For a divorce lawyer that might be posting about services for families in their local community. If you’re a real estate lawyer, that might mean linking to an article about how to find a reputable moving company, or a YouTube video on packing tips. A debt relief lawyer I know posts all kinds of articles, information and resources about things like how to save on school supplies and where to find the best credit card deals.

As I’ve said before, it’s about providing value to your audience. The news can be a fantastic source for posts, as can trade or special interest publications or websites. You can post about or link to an article in the local news that relates to your practice area. Or post about events in your local community.

When it comes to posting on LinkedIn, the only limit is your creativity.

I’m Allison Shields, President of Legal Ease Consulting, and I help lawyers use resources like LinkedIn to identify and attract their ideal clients. If you found this video helpful, please share it with your friends and colleagues. You can find more tips and information about what I do here on my website.

Have an idea for a future video? Let me know in the comments below!

Managing Staff Interruptions

Hi, I’m Allison Shields, President of Legal Ease Consulting, where I help lawyers attract the right clients, increase their productivity, and improve their bottom line.

As a practicing lawyer, one of the problems I observed with the lawyers around me, and still observe today with my clients and my lawyer friends is that when they finally got some time in the office to actually catch up on paperwork, or respond to phone calls or emails, they got even less done than they did when they were out of the office, whether that was in court, at a closing, a deposition o a client meeting.

And why does that happen? Well, it happens because when they were in the office, they were constantly being interrupted. There are lots of interruptions, but the one we’re going to talk about today is staff interruptions.

You know what I’m talking about – you’re in your office, finally trying to get some work done, and there’s a line of people outside your door waiting to speak to you, or your assistant is constantly bombarding you with questions all day long. This happens because your staff feels insecure – they have no idea when they’re going to see you again or when you’ll be available to speak with them, and so when they see you, they just grab you.

One way to avoid this is by setting regular meetings with the staff and people in your office that you work most closely with. But the key to this is to be consistent, because the point is to reduce their insecurity. You’ll want to give them a definite time when they know that they’ll be able to get their questions answered, or to speak with you.

I recommend that you set a regular schedule of meetings with those people. So for example, maybe that’s meeting with your assistant every day at 4 pm, and the associate that you work most closely with once a week on Tuesday morning, and maybe your billing person once a month to talk about billing and collections issues on the first Monday of the month. This way, they know when they can get to you, and they’ll collect all of their questions to ask you at once.

My clients who have implemented this have found not only that it has drastically reduced interruptions during the day, but it has also increased the productivity of their entire team, and it has allowed them to anticipate problems before they arise.

What are your challenges with staff or other interruptions? Leave me a comment below.

What to Post on LinkedIn (Part 1)

In my last video, we addressed some fears about posting on LinkedIn and ended with the idea that if you approach posting on LinkedIn as a way to help your audience, rather than a way simply to promote yourself it might be more comfortable for you.

But what, exactly, do you post? Well, keep your audience, their needs, wants, and problems, and challenges it becomes much easier. And if you already create your own content, it’s even easier.

Don’t Know What to Post on LinkedIn? Start Here

In my last video about LinkedIn, I talked about the fact that starting a Profile and just collecting Connections isn’t really enough if you want to get something out of LinkedIn. You have to actually engage with other people to see results.

Hi, my name is Allison Shields, and I am the President of Legal Ease Consulting, where I help lawyers create more productive, more profitable and more enjoyable law practices. One of the ways I do that is by helping them to improve their LinkedIn presence.

Just like in real life, if you want to engage with others on LinkedIn, one of the things that you can do is simply create a post, share information, or start a conversation. But when I talk to lawyers about using LinkedIn, a lot of them tell me they’re afraid to post regularly. They don’t want to annoy their Connections by posting too much, or they don’t know what to post, or they’re afraid of running afoul of the ethics rules.

The truth of the matter is that most lawyers that I see don’t engage often enough on LinkedIn or post often enough to be effective, let alone to annoy their Connections.

When you post on LinkedIn, the post shows up in the Feed of your followers and your connections on their LinkedIn Home page. But in reality, they’re not going to see everything that you post. LinkedIn has way too much volume of activity for everybody to see everything that you do. Also, LinkedIn sorts posts by what they consider “top” posts by default, as opposed to the most recent posts. So, the more engagement a post receives, the more likes, comments or shares it gets, the more likely it is that your Connections are going to actually see that post. But if that’s the case, it also means that that Post is probably more valuable to your network, as evidenced by the fact that other people have already engaged with it. So don’t be afraid to Post on a regular basis.

But what do you post?

Well, in my next video, I’ll give you some ideas and some examples, but for now, let me just leave you with this thought: when you’re creating a post on LinkedIn, don’t think about talking about yourself; think instead about how you can help the people in your network. So, what keeps your clients up at night? What useful or valuable information can you share?

Hopefully thinking about posting as a way of helping other people, instead of as a way of talking about yourself, will make it a little more comfortable for you.

Again, my name is Allison Shields, and I’m the President of Legal Ease Consulting. To see other videos in this LinkedIn series, please visit my website at LawyerMeltdown.com.

Conquer Your To-Do List With The Power of Three

Do you have a to-do list that never ends because every time you cross one thing off of it, you add three more? If this sounds like you, watch this video below to find out how to use one of my favorite strategies, the Power of Three, to end your to-do list tyranny.

Like this video? Leave a comment, share with your network, or check out my other videos.

Overwhelmed? Try this calendar hack

If you feel overwhelmed from the moment you arrive at work until the moment you leave, perhaps you’re not using one of the best – and easiest to use – tools effectively. And that tool is your calendar.

In this video, I talk about how you can use your calendar not just to record when work is due, but also to find the time to do the work.

How NOT to Use Email

Email is a fantastic tool – but it isn’t the right tool for every job. Email is especially poor for scheduling meetings, particularly meetings for more than two people. Use a dedicated scheduling tool instead. Learn more in the video below.

Use QuickParts to Streamline Your Workload

My latest video talks about how you can use Quick Parts in Word or Outlook to help streamline your workload. Instead of reinventing the wheel all of the time, create a Quick Part for frequently asked questions, email responses or other repetitive copy.

Automate Your Email Inbox

Why waste time sorting through your email inbox to find the most relevant messages when you can set up your email program to do it for you?

This is the latest in our series of tips about handling your email more effectively. In the previous two videos, we talked about eliminating email as a source of distraction throughout your day and using the triage method to handle email when you do look at your inbox.

In this next installment in the series, I’ll discuss ways you can set up your inbox to automate the process of sorting your email so you can concentrate on the emails that are the most important to your practice.

Triage Your Email Inbox

Email is a HUGE time-waster, as we can see from this short video on how to prevent email from becoming a distraction.

But when you do choose to look at your email inbox, what’s the best approach? The video below outlines the triage approach.

Building Your LinkedIn Network

LinkedIn is a professional networking platform. That means that the same rules of engagement for in-person networking also apply to LinkedIn. This short video gives you some times about how to network effectively on LinkedIn.

Email Tips: Don’t Let Email Be A Distraction!

Email can be a great productivity tool or it can be a huge distraction that puts others’ priorities ahead of your own and prevents you from getting important work done. This short video includes a few quick tips for keeping email from being a distraction.