Can a Tomato Make You More Productive?

Can a tomato make you more productive?

Hi, I’m Allison Shields Johs, President of Legal Ease Consulting, where I help lawyers create more productive, more profitable, and more enjoyable law practices.

I don’t know about you, but lately I seem to be having a very difficult time focusing and accomplishing what I want to accomplish. I’ve worked from home for many years, but lately I seem to get distracted more easily. Perhaps it’s the pandemic and all of the anxieties that have gone along with it. Or perhaps it’s just Zoom fatigue. Who knows? But whatever the reason, I’m finding I have to fall back on some tips and tricks to help me get things done, and today I’d like to share one of those with you.

That’s where the tomato comes in.

The tip I’d like to talk about today is called the “Pomodoro” technique – pomodoro is the Italian word for tomato. The pomodoro technique was developed by an Italian, and it was named after a timer that looks like a tomato.

Here’s how it works:

First, you decide on the task you want to get done. Then you set a timer for a specific interval of time – traditionally 25 minutes – and you work on the task without any interruption at all for that interval. Once the timer goes off, you can stop and take a 5-minute break. Each interval represents one pomodoro.

In the traditional pomodoro method, you would do four consecutive pomodoros, and then take a longer 15-30 minute break.

If you complete the task while the timer is still ticking, you can use the additional time in the pomodoro to review your work or plan tasks for your next pomodoro. Of course, there are all sorts of variations of this technique, and you might choose to make your pomodoros 60, or even 90 minutes long.

But whatever variation you choose, using this system helps you to focus on the task at hand for a long enough period of time to accomplish something significant, but it is a short enough time that you won’t allow yourself to become distracted. Since you have a break every 25 minutes, you can address anything urgent that might come up in the interim.

For lawyers billing by the hour, using the pomodoro technique is also helpful for ensuring that you are billing your time contemporaneously with the work being performed. But even if you aren’t billing by the hour, using the pomodoro technique is useful for improving your ability to estimate how long it takes you to complete certain tasks, which can help your overall time management.

For me, just the idea of blocking out a discrete segment of time with no distractions has proved useful for moving me forward toward my goals, so I hope it will be useful for you, too.

Again, I’m Allison Shields Johs, from Legal Ease Consulting, wishing you a productive day – and now, since it’s lunchtime, I think I’m going to make myself a BLT!

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Do You Need a LinkedIn Premium Account?

Do you need a premium account to get the most out of LinkedIn?

This might be the single most common question I get when speaking or training on LinkedIn.  And while I will say that my co-author on Make LinkedIn Work for You, A Practical Handbook for Lawyers and Other Legal Professionals is a firm devotee of the premium version, I personally have always used the free version and found it to be entirely adequate for my purposes. However, there are some situations when a premium account might make sense for you.

There are several different kinds of LinkedIn premium subscriptions, for different purposes. For example, there are LinkedIn Career accounts that can be helpful if you’re looking for a job, Recruiter accounts if you’re responsible for hiring that can help you locate and communicate with potential job candidates, Sales Navigator accounts that help you find sales leads and Business Accounts.

What’s the difference between the free and premium versions of LinkedIn?

The main differences between the free accounts and the various premium accounts are:

In Mail: Premium LinkedIn Accounts give you additional “In Mail” messages, meaning you can contact people who are outside of your network more easily. With a free account you only get 3 In Mail messages; premium accounts provide more, depending on which subscription you have.

Who’s Viewed Your Profile: LinkedIn Premium account subscribers will get more insights and see more information about the people who have viewed their Profile than you will get with a free account. This is one of the main reasons my co-author is a fan of Premium accounts – he likes to see who’s looking at him on LinkedIn.

Search results: Similarly, with a premium account, you’ll get more results in your searches and be able to view more profiles of people who appear in your search results – up to third level connections. But with a well-crafted search, the 100 results you’ll get with a free account should be plenty in most circumstances.

Some of the premium plans, such as the Sales Navigator plan, also include additional search filters that can help you locate and save leads.

Additional advantages: There are other advantages as well, such as access to courses through LinkedIn Learning, and additional business insights about companies on LinkedIn.

In general, for most of my clients, unless you’re actively looking for a job, or are in charge of hiring for your firm, I recommend that you start with a free account. In my experience, most lawyers (and other business professionals) are only using a fraction of what is available on the free version. Once you start actively using LinkedIn on a regular basis, if you find that you are being prevented from finding or viewing information that is important to you, you can always try one of LinkedIn’s premium subscriptions for free for 30 days.

Want more information about how to use LinkedIn? Pick up a copy of Make LinkedIn Work for You on amazon.com, or contact me for one on one guidance.

Check out my other LinkedIn videos here:

What Should I Do With My LinkedIn Connections?

What should I do with my LinkedIn connections?

This question is one I get from lawyers all of the time. They have lots of connections on LinkedIn, but they’re just sitting there – they aren’t doing much for them.

In my last video, I gave a couple of suggestions to answer this question, including looking at the LinkedIn Groups your connection belongs to for ideas about Groups to join that might contain other people similar to this Connection, and reviewing your Connection list weekly to identify people to contact so that you continue to strengthen your existing network.

Today, I want to give you a few more suggestions.

Mine your Connections’ Connections. In many cases, once you’re connected to someone on LinkedIn, you can see who else they are connected to by clicking on the number of their connections in their introduction card at the top of their LinkedIn Profile. You can also sort and filter those connections so, for example, you could filter their connections to see only their connections that are in your geographic area or in a specific industry. This provides you with a whole list of potential connections, many of who are likely to be in your target audience.

But this isn’t about just adding more and more connections. This is networking, so you need to find ways to keep the conversation and the relationship moving forward.

One way to do that is to Offer to Make Introductions for Your Connections. Once you get to know them a little better, invite your LinkedIn connections to review your list of connections and to let you know if they want you to introduce them to anyone.

Review your Newsfeed regularly for posts from your Connections. Networking is just as much, if not more, about giving than it is about getting. Not only will reviewing your Newsfeed regularly provide you with insights about your target audience and their interests, but it also gives you an opportunity to promote the work of your connections by sharing or commenting on what they post.

I hope you enjoyed this video. If you want even more in-depth LinkedIn tips, register for my LinkedIn Essentials online course here.

Watch more videos about LinkedIn here:

LinkedIn Search Hacks

Are you having trouble finding what you want in LinkedIn Search? Or are you running into problems with LinkedIn’s search quotas on free accounts?

Hi, I’m Allison Shields Johs, President of Legal Ease Consulting, where I help lawyers create more productive, more profitable, and more enjoyable law practices, and the co-author of the book, Make LinkedIn Work for You, A Practical Handbook for Lawyers and Other Legal Professionals.

One of the best uses for LinkedIn is to expand your network of referral sources and go-to professionals to help your clients with services beyond what you can offer to them. But sometimes it’s hard to find people to connect with using LinkedIn’s regular search features, especially if you have a free account. While the free account is usually quite sufficient for most lawyers’ purposes, I do sometimes recommend testing out a premium account if you start running into roadblocks using LinkedIn. One of those roadblocks is LinkedIn search. But you may not need to shell out for a premium account just yet.

 Today I have two LinkedIn search tips to share with you that might help if you’re running into the problems I just described, and if the filters on the free accounts aren’t proving to be enough for you.

The first tip is to put those legal research skills you learned in law school to use to help you get better results. Those Boolean searches that work so well in legal research will also work in LinkedIn – you can use quotation marks, ‘and’ ‘or’ and ‘not’ or use parentheticals to perform complicated searches in LinkedIn. When using AND OR or NOT, in the LinkedIn search field, you must capitalize them.

My second tip is to use Google to search for people to connect with on LinkedIn – especially if you are doing a lot of searches and running into LinkedIn’s search quotas on a free account. Enter your search terms in the Google search box, and include LinkedIn as a search term. Or put your search terms into Google but limit the search to LinkedIn using Google’s advanced search and the site: LinkedIn. This will give you results within Google, and then you can click on any results that look interesting to view the person’s profile on LinkedIn and decide whether to connect. Since your original search was done in Google, rather than LinkedIn, it shouldn’t count against your search quota in LinkedIn.

If you want to learn how to use LinkedIn more effectively, click here to get your copy of my 47 LinkedIn Tips for Lawyers and Legal Professionals.

Watch more of my videos about LinkedIn here:

Making the Most Out of Your LinkedIn Connections

Are you making the most of your LinkedIn connections?

My co-author on Make LinkedIn Work for You, A Practical Handbook for Lawyers and Other Legal Professionals, Dennis Kennedy, recently ran a poll on social media asking what one aspect of LinkedIn lawyers wanted to improve the most this year, and the winner was Connections. A lot of the professionals I talk to know how to make a connection on LinkedIn by sending or accepting an invitation, but nothing happens after that. Making the connection shouldn’t be the end – it should be the beginning of an ongoing relationship. Don’t let the accepted invitation be the end of your interaction.

Here are a few ways you can make the most of your LinkedIn connections:

Take another look at your new connection’s Profile. Hopefully you’ve looked at their Profile before you sent or accepted the invitation to connect and found some common ground. Look at their Profile again, now that you are connected. You may see even more information than you were able to access before. What insights can you glean from the information on their Profile? How can you help them, either directly or indirectly?

One great thing to look at on your Connections’ profiles is the LinkedIn Groups they belong to. Scroll to the bottom of their Profile and click on “see all” at the bottom of the Interests box. Then click on Groups to see all of the Groups your Connection is a part of on LinkedIn. Chances are that at least a few of these Groups contain other like-minded or similarly-situated individuals who would also make good LinkedIn connections for you. Consider joining those Groups to get in front of these individuals.

Stay in touch. A relationship that isn’t nurtured will not grow. Go through your LinkedIn connections list weekly to identify Connections to send a message to. It can be as simple as saying Happy New Year, mentioning that you haven’t been in touch in a while and want to see how they are doing, inviting them to a Zoom meeting, or sending them a link to something interesting. Use LinkedIn’s notifications to congratulate those that have gotten a new job or had a work anniversary.

For more LinkedIn Connections tips, download my 47 LinkedIn Tips sheet or pick up a copy of Make LinkedIn Work for You at Amazon.com.

Happy Connecting!

How to Get More Traffic to Your LinkedIn Company Page

Do you have a LinkedIn Page for your business or law firm but don’t have many followers?

One of the most frequent questions I get about LinkedIn Pages (which are for businesses, as opposed to Profiles for individuals) is, “How do I get more traffic to my LinkedIn Page?” It used to be very difficult. You could add a follow button to your website, or send individual messages or posts with links to follow your Page. But I could never understand why business owners didn’t have the same ability to directly invite people to like or follow their LinkedIn company or firm page that business owners have on Facebook. Now you finally do.

LinkedIn has now added the ability to invite your Connections to Like your LinkedIn Page for your law firm, and it’s very easy to do. There’s a new invite connections module on the right sidebar on your Admin Page, or you can use the tools dropdown in the top right corner and click on invite connections to choose which connections to invite to like your Page.

You’ll also want to make sure that all of your employees have LinkedIn Profiles and that they list the firm as their current employer (Make sure they list it exactly the way it is listed on the firm’s Company Page). When they do so, they’ll automatically become followers of the Company Page, and they’ll show as employees of the firm when someone views the Company Page.

If you’ve uploaded your logo to the Company Page, that logo will also show on the employees’ Profiles, and it will be linked to your Company Page. This way, viewers of your employees’ Profiles on LinkedIn will be directed to your Company Page if they click on the logo.

Finally, don’t forget that when visitors reach your LinkedIn Page, you want to make sure that it’s stocked with valuable content that they can use!

Get a free copy of my LinkedIn tips sheet here – or watch more videos about LinkedIn:

Are You Using Keywords Strategically on Your Website?

Are you using keywords strageically on your law firm website?

Keywords are words that your potential clients would use to search the internet for a lawyer who does what you do.

The golden rule of writing website copy is to write for human beings first, and search engines second. So you should never force or “stuff” keywords into your site. But as you are writing your web copy, you should think about using keywords strategically in a way that flows naturally on the page.

What do I mean by using keywords strategically? Well, did you know that each page on your website should target a different set of keywords?

And did you know that there are certain “power positions” on each webpage that Google and other search engines pay more attention to?

tiles spelling out SEO

When reading your web pages, search engines use algorithms, or specific sets of rules to determine what the page is about and to decide whether to return that page as a result in a search query. And they give more importance to certain elements on your web page, because the search engines assume that the copy that is used in those elements is likely a good indicator of what the page is about.

There are 5 power positions on your web pages where you should consider including your targeted keywords:

  • Headlines – especially the main (H1) headline on the page
  • Subheads
  • Bold text
  • Link text
  • Captions

If your keywords are incorporated into those power positions, your web page will rank higher in search for those keywords.

As I’ve mentioned in other videos, to be most effective, keywords also should be incorporated in your site’s meta-data, the behind the scenes code for the page that search engines see, but visitors don’t.

See more videos about law firm websites:

3 C’s of Strong Websites

Did you know that 75% of people judge a business by their website?

While lawyers may think this isn’t true for them, the fact is that, especially now, when many of our encounters are purely virtual, more and more potential clients will be judging you by your website.

A weak website can cost you up to 50% of your potential business.[i]

Let’s talk about three C’s for strong websites: clear, client-focused, and consistent. Let’s look at each one.

Clear

Attention spans are getting shorter by the day. Most people give your website only 8 seconds before they click away if they can’t find what they want or they aren’t sure they’re in the right place. I talked about this a bit in a previous video in relation to your Home page, but not every web visitor lands on your Home page first. Clarity is important on every page of your website.

That means that in the first 8 seconds, it should be clear to any visitor what your law firm does, who you do it for, where you are located, how to find what they are looking for, and what to do next.

[To keep your message clear, text should be easy to read – preferably dark text on a light background – and images should be related to the content of the site.]

Client-focused

Next, your website needs to be focused on your clients. Many law firm websites are weak because they focus more on the law firm than the client. Your website is about your firm, but it is for your clients.

To be client-focused, your website should speak to one client at a time, as if you’re having a conversation with them.

It should instantly solve a need for them; you want your ideal client to  land on your site and immediately think that you’re the solution for them because you understand their problem and know how to solve it.

And it should answer their most common questions.

To do all of that, you need to know your potential clients, their needs, and how best to speak to them.

Consistent

The third C is consistent – your website needs to have a consistent voice in the copy throughout the site, and it should flow logically.

The look and feel needs to be consistent throughout the site as well. Page layouts, headers, footers, and navigation should be consistent. [If navigation is at the top of the page on the Home page, that’s where it should be elsewhere on the site.] You want your potential clients to stay engaged and to be sure that they haven’t accidentally navigated to a different site.

Is your law firm website clear, client-focused and consistent?


[i] https://www.business.com/articles/7-website-design-mistakes-that-can-hurt-conversion/

See more of my videos about law firm websites:

Pronunciation Problems? LinkedIn Can Help

Are you tired of people mispronouncing your name? Or are you one of those people who’s horrible about figuring out how to pronounce a name just by looking at it? If so, LinkedIn can help.

Hi, I’m Allison Shields Johs, President of Legal Ease Consulting, where I help lawyers create more productive, more profitable, and more enjoyable law practices. I’m also the co-author of Make LinkedIn Work for You: A Practical Handbook for Lawyers and Other Legal Professionals. But whether you are a lawyer or not, this tip will come in handy for you.

LinkedIn has added a handy new feature to its profiles – you can now add a recording of your name and display its pronunciation on your Profile. This feature is not available on the desktop version of LinkedIn – you can only do it on the mobile version of LinkedIn on your iPhone or Android phone.

To record and display the pronunciation of your name on your LinkedIn profile, click on the icon to edit in your introduction card, which is at the very top of your profile – the area where your picture appears. Tap the plus sign next to record name pronunciation, then press and hold the record button while you record yourself saying your name slowly and clearly. Make sure you are recording in a place with no background noise; you can redo the recording as many times as you like until you’re satisfied. Don’t forget to press save!

I would encourage everyone to do this as soon as possible, even if you think your name is easy to pronounce. LinkedIn is a world-wide program, and although your name might be common in your country, it may not be common to everyone – or even to those living in your country who are not native to your country. To me, this is a game-changer, since I am terrible at figuring out how to pronounce people’s names, which can make for awkward calls or conversations.

If you want more information about how to improve your LinkedIn presence, get a copy of my free printable LinkedIn tips sheet here.

More LinkedIn videos:

Setting Up Your Law Practice for Success in the New Year

Is your law practice ready for 2021?

If we’ve learned anything from 2020, it’s that we absolutely cannot predict the future, and that our plans can be derailed at a moment’s notice. But believe it or not, that’s exactly why it’s so important to take the time to make a strategic plan for what you want to accomplish in the new year.

Taking the time to make a plan in uncertain times is important because the process of making the plan forces you to think strategically about your practice – to take stock of where you are now, where you want to go in the future, and what steps you need to take to get you there. You’ll get a good handle on information like:

  • Your firm’s core values
  • Your firm’s strengths and weaknesses
  • Who your clients are, where they come from and their most pressing needs
  • Your expenses
  • Your most and least productive employees
  • Your firm’s priorities

That means if the unexpected happens and you have to make adjustments – or even if you have a year like 2020 and you have to scrap the plan and start all over, you won’t be starting from square one, because you’ve already done the hard work and you already have the information necessary to see exactly which parts of the plan need to be modified and what to do next.

When you haven’t done the work and you don’t have a plan, that’s when you get into trouble because you have no idea where to start or what to do next.

To get your firm ready for 2021 now, make planning a priority – gather your data, set your goals, and outline the strategies and tactics you intend to pursue to reach those goals.  If you need more help, download a copy of my free 2021 planning guide here.

Introducing LinkedIn Essentials Online Course for Lawyers [video]

Is 2021 the year you finally learn how to make LinkedIn work for you?

Hi, I’m Allison Shields Johs, President of Legal Ease Consulting and co-author of Make LinkedIn Work for You, A Practical Handbook for Lawyers and Other Legal Professionals. This is the third LinkedIn book my co-author, Dennis Kennedy and I have written, and we’ve taught hundreds of seminars and webinars on LinkedIn over the past 10 years. We’re excited to announce our latest project – our brand-new online course, LinkedIn Essentials.

The course was developed based on the book and on the many questions we’ve received over the years in speaking about and training lawyers and other legal professionals on how to use LinkedIn, but it’s more in-depth than any webinar or training we’ve done before, and it’s geared specifically for the legal profession.

The course was designed to show legal professionals how to use LinkedIn effectively to:

  • Expand their networks
  • Build their reputation, and
  • Accomplish their business goals,

Ethically and effectively.

Here’s what is included in the course:

9 video lessons based on the 3 building blocks of LinkedIn: Profiles, Connections, and Participation.

We’ll show you:

  • Exactly what to do with your Profile to improve your visibility
  • How to make meaningful connections on LinkedIn and leverage those connections for your practice and your career
  • What and how to post and participate on LinkedIn to maximize your results.

We’ll cover the FAQs we receive most often from legal professionals on LinkedIn.

We wrap up with a action plan for you to follow that tells you exactly what steps to take over the next three months on LinkedIn.

Each lesson has an accompanying worksheet to help you reinforce what you’ve learned and show you how to tailor it to your goals.

The course handouts also include a free chapter from our book, as well as our 47 LinkedIn tips.

You can take this course at your own pace and ask questions in our private network as you go along.

To learn more about LinkedIn Essentials, contact me at Allison@LegalEaseConsulting, or click on the link below.

Again, I’m Allison Shields Johs, and I look forward to seeing you inside our LinkedIn Essentials course!

LinkedIn Essentials: https://kennedy-idea-propulsion-laboratory.mn.co/landing/plans/106740

3 Steps to a Better Mobile Experience for Your Law Firm Website

Are you missing out on business because your website doesn’t provide a good experience for mobile users?

person using a smartphone

Studies have shown that millions of people access the internet exclusively through their smartphone or other mobile device, and that 73% of people will leave a site that is difficult to use on a mobile device in favor of a competitor’s site.

I’ve been looking at a number of local lawyer’s websites lately, and I’m surprised at how many of them are not optimized for a mobile experience – which is scary, given the statistics I just mentioned.

Here are three ways you can improve your website experience for mobile users:

Make Sure Your Site is Mobile Responsive

What is mobile-responsive? A mobile responsive website is one that is designed to adapt itself to the device used to access the site. The site will appear slightly different on a desktop, smartphone and tablet, and will adapt to create the best user experience possible on that device. (This is different from a mobile-friendly site, which usually means that there are two different versions of the site- one that is used with a mobile device and one that is used with a desktop client, and that can create headaches with two sites to manage.)

Also, Google prioritizes mobile-responsive websites in search results, so even if a user is searching on a desktop computer, if your site isn’t mobile responsive, it is less likely to show up in search.

Create a Compelling Description

Once your site is mobile-responsive, it will increase the chances that it will show up in search results. But if what they see in the search results isn’t compelling, they still might not click through to your site. To fix that, make sure that your site description is persuasive and speaks to the problem the potential client is trying to solve.

Make Your Initial Copy Count

Take a look at your law firm website on your phone. What do you see on the first screen that pops up without scrolling? Not much, right? Can you immediately tell what you do and who you do it for? The headline first few sentences of copy on your site need to provide the most important information you want web visitors to know – if it’s hard to find or if they think you can’t solve their problem, they may click away to another site.

Want to know how I can help you with your law firm’s website? Contact me to schedule a consultation, or watch some of my videos:

3 Ways to Make Your Website More Competitive

Is your law firm website competitive? In other words, does it help you stand out from your competition and rank well in the search engines? Here are three ways to make your law firm website more competitive.

Why us?
First, ensure that your website answers the question, “Why us?”

Why should a potential client choose you or your law firm over other lawyers or law firms that do what you do? Why are you the best solution for them?

Talk about what’s different about your experience, about the services that you provide, the way you provide those services, or even the way you charge your fees. But make sure that your website answers that question, why.

Use keywords or keyphrases strategically

Second, include keywords and key phrases in the content on your website that your potential clients would use to search on the internet for a lawyer who does what you do.

What words and phrases do they use to describe their problems or challenges? What would they actually type into Google if they were looking for a lawyer who does what you do? Incorporate those keywords and key phrases in the content on your site, but make sure that you’re doing it in a natural way that flows conversationally in your content, don’t just shove those words in for the sake of putting them on to the website – you’ll actually get penalized by Google for doing that.

Pay attention to your site’s metadata

Third, make sure that the metadata on your site signals Google and other search engines what your site and each page on that site is about.

Metadata is code that your web visitors don’t see, but that search engines use to return the most relevant results to any search query. That means those keywords and key phrases that those clients are searching for should be incorporated not just in your body content, but also in your site’s metadata.

Two big places to make sure that they’re included in your metadata on every page, are (1) the title of your page, and (2) the meta description. Those two things together are what make up the search results. When you type something into Google and you see a result, what you’re seeing is the page title, and the meta description.

To recap, use keywords and phrases in both the content and the metadata on your website.

If you’d like to chat about how your website is working for you and how I can help it become more competitive, please email me.

See more videos:

3 Ways Video Can Help Your Law Practice

Are you still not using video in your law practice? Here are three easy ways to incorporate video into your law practice.

Marketing
The first one is marketing. And it’s probably the most obvious.

People do business with people they know like, and trust. But these days, we’re not getting to spend too much time with people. We can’t go to big events, and we’re not doing in-person networking. For many of us, we’re not even seeing our family and friends, so it’s that much harder to get the word out and to meet new people. It’s all virtual.

That means video is now more than ever, a really important tool for you to help people get to know you. When they watch a video. It’s like talking to you; they feel like they know you before they even pick up the phone or send you an email.

Answer Clients’ Frequently Asked Questions
The second way that you can use video in your law practice is by answering clients’ frequently asked questions.

I often talk to my clients about putting frequently asked questions on their website for potential clients. But the same thing is true for your existing clients.

You’ve probably answered the same questions over and over from clients – and it’s time-consuming. If you create a video library to answer clients frequently asked questions, you can send them there first and free up some more time for you to do important client work. It’s a great reference tool for them.

Onboarding and Training New Employees
The third way to use video is to onboard and train new employees.

A lot of my solo and small firm lawyers tell me that it’s really time-consuming to train. And they often don’t want to hire somebody because they don’t have the time to spend training – they need help.

If you create training videos or videos that explain what your firm does, how you do things, and who your clients are, and give them training on the specific ways that you do things differently than other firms might, you only have to create the vidoes once. That takes some of the burden of training off of you. And it also creates a place that your employees can go back to for reference if they have questions or if they’re not sure how to do something.

I’m sure you can come up with even more ways that you can use video in your practice. Video doesn’t have to be expensive or time-consuming to produce. For example, I’m creating this video on a Videosocials call. (I highly recommend Videosocials – if you decide to try them out, let them know I sent you!)

Want more tips about how I can help your practice? Contact me – or watch more of my videos:

Is Your Website Turning Off Potential Clients?

In today’s video, I talk about three common mistakes that I see lawyers make on their websites. Or if you prefer, scroll down to read about these three mistakes.

It’s not easy to find what I’m looking for

The first one is that it’s not so easy to find what you’re looking for on the website. That might be because the navigation is hidden; your main menu should ideally be on the top or on the left side of your website.

Or it could be that the navigation buttons just aren’t clear – maybe you’re using legalese – using terms that lawyers use for what you do, instead of using the terms that your clients would use.

Or perhaps your navigation menus are just too big, and you have drop-down menus that continue off the page, making it very difficult to click through to find what you’re looking for.

You’re wasting prime real estate “above the fold”

The second mistake that I see a lot of lawyers making on their websites is that they waste the real estate above the fold, which is what you see when you first arrive on that very first screen on the website.

Too many lawyers put huge images above the fold and don’t leave enough room for copy to explain what they do and who they do it for. And it’s even worse when the image has absolutely nothing to do with what the lawyer actually does, or the image doesn’t mean anything at all to their web visitor.

The Home page is so cluttered, it’s distracting

The third mistake is there are just too many distractions on the website. There are a lot of ways that this can happen:

  • Using chat bots that constantly interrupt the web visitor and messing up their experience or getting in the way so they can’t find what they’re looking for.
  • Pop-ups that appear on every page, again, getting in the way of letting the web visitor find the information that they’re really seeking.
  • Big carousels with scrolling images or text that goes by so fast that you can’t even read it.
  • Poorly done video. Video is a great tool if used properly, but it can also be a distraction. Don’t post a video that will automatically play as soon as somebody comes on the website.

If you’d like to know how I can help you improve the user experience on your website, and turn your potential clients on instead of turning them off, please email me.

Watch more videos here: