3 Steps to a Better Mobile Experience for Your Law Firm Website

Are you missing out on business because your website doesn’t provide a good experience for mobile users?

person using a smartphone

Studies have shown that millions of people access the internet exclusively through their smartphone or other mobile device, and that 73% of people will leave a site that is difficult to use on a mobile device in favor of a competitor’s site.

I’ve been looking at a number of local lawyer’s websites lately, and I’m surprised at how many of them are not optimized for a mobile experience – which is scary, given the statistics I just mentioned.

Here are three ways you can improve your website experience for mobile users:

Make Sure Your Site is Mobile Responsive

What is mobile-responsive? A mobile responsive website is one that is designed to adapt itself to the device used to access the site. The site will appear slightly different on a desktop, smartphone and tablet, and will adapt to create the best user experience possible on that device. (This is different from a mobile-friendly site, which usually means that there are two different versions of the site- one that is used with a mobile device and one that is used with a desktop client, and that can create headaches with two sites to manage.)

Also, Google prioritizes mobile-responsive websites in search results, so even if a user is searching on a desktop computer, if your site isn’t mobile responsive, it is less likely to show up in search.

Create a Compelling Description

Once your site is mobile-responsive, it will increase the chances that it will show up in search results. But if what they see in the search results isn’t compelling, they still might not click through to your site. To fix that, make sure that your site description is persuasive and speaks to the problem the potential client is trying to solve.

Make Your Initial Copy Count

Take a look at your law firm website on your phone. What do you see on the first screen that pops up without scrolling? Not much, right? Can you immediately tell what you do and who you do it for? The headline first few sentences of copy on your site need to provide the most important information you want web visitors to know – if it’s hard to find or if they think you can’t solve their problem, they may click away to another site.

Want to know how I can help you with your law firm’s website? Contact me to schedule a consultation, or watch some of my videos:

3 Ways to Make Your Website More Competitive

Is your law firm website competitive? In other words, does it help you stand out from your competition and rank well in the search engines? Here are three ways to make your law firm website more competitive.

Why us?
First, ensure that your website answers the question, “Why us?”

Why should a potential client choose you or your law firm over other lawyers or law firms that do what you do? Why are you the best solution for them?

Talk about what’s different about your experience, about the services that you provide, the way you provide those services, or even the way you charge your fees. But make sure that your website answers that question, why.

Use keywords or keyphrases strategically

Second, include keywords and key phrases in the content on your website that your potential clients would use to search on the internet for a lawyer who does what you do.

What words and phrases do they use to describe their problems or challenges? What would they actually type into Google if they were looking for a lawyer who does what you do? Incorporate those keywords and key phrases in the content on your site, but make sure that you’re doing it in a natural way that flows conversationally in your content, don’t just shove those words in for the sake of putting them on to the website – you’ll actually get penalized by Google for doing that.

Pay attention to your site’s metadata

Third, make sure that the metadata on your site signals Google and other search engines what your site and each page on that site is about.

Metadata is code that your web visitors don’t see, but that search engines use to return the most relevant results to any search query. That means those keywords and key phrases that those clients are searching for should be incorporated not just in your body content, but also in your site’s metadata.

Two big places to make sure that they’re included in your metadata on every page, are (1) the title of your page, and (2) the meta description. Those two things together are what make up the search results. When you type something into Google and you see a result, what you’re seeing is the page title, and the meta description.

To recap, use keywords and phrases in both the content and the metadata on your website.

If you’d like to chat about how your website is working for you and how I can help it become more competitive, please email me.

See more videos:

3 Ways Video Can Help Your Law Practice

Are you still not using video in your law practice? Here are three easy ways to incorporate video into your law practice.

Marketing
The first one is marketing. And it’s probably the most obvious.

People do business with people they know like, and trust. But these days, we’re not getting to spend too much time with people. We can’t go to big events, and we’re not doing in-person networking. For many of us, we’re not even seeing our family and friends, so it’s that much harder to get the word out and to meet new people. It’s all virtual.

That means video is now more than ever, a really important tool for you to help people get to know you. When they watch a video. It’s like talking to you; they feel like they know you before they even pick up the phone or send you an email.

Answer Clients’ Frequently Asked Questions
The second way that you can use video in your law practice is by answering clients’ frequently asked questions.

I often talk to my clients about putting frequently asked questions on their website for potential clients. But the same thing is true for your existing clients.

You’ve probably answered the same questions over and over from clients – and it’s time-consuming. If you create a video library to answer clients frequently asked questions, you can send them there first and free up some more time for you to do important client work. It’s a great reference tool for them.

Onboarding and Training New Employees
The third way to use video is to onboard and train new employees.

A lot of my solo and small firm lawyers tell me that it’s really time-consuming to train. And they often don’t want to hire somebody because they don’t have the time to spend training – they need help.

If you create training videos or videos that explain what your firm does, how you do things, and who your clients are, and give them training on the specific ways that you do things differently than other firms might, you only have to create the vidoes once. That takes some of the burden of training off of you. And it also creates a place that your employees can go back to for reference if they have questions or if they’re not sure how to do something.

I’m sure you can come up with even more ways that you can use video in your practice. Video doesn’t have to be expensive or time-consuming to produce. For example, I’m creating this video on a Videosocials call. (I highly recommend Videosocials – if you decide to try them out, let them know I sent you!)

Want more tips about how I can help your practice? Contact me – or watch more of my videos:

Is Your Website Turning Off Potential Clients?

In today’s video, I talk about three common mistakes that I see lawyers make on their websites. Or if you prefer, scroll down to read about these three mistakes.

It’s not easy to find what I’m looking for

The first one is that it’s not so easy to find what you’re looking for on the website. That might be because the navigation is hidden; your main menu should ideally be on the top or on the left side of your website.

Or it could be that the navigation buttons just aren’t clear – maybe you’re using legalese – using terms that lawyers use for what you do, instead of using the terms that your clients would use.

Or perhaps your navigation menus are just too big, and you have drop-down menus that continue off the page, making it very difficult to click through to find what you’re looking for.

You’re wasting prime real estate “above the fold”

The second mistake that I see a lot of lawyers making on their websites is that they waste the real estate above the fold, which is what you see when you first arrive on that very first screen on the website.

Too many lawyers put huge images above the fold and don’t leave enough room for copy to explain what they do and who they do it for. And it’s even worse when the image has absolutely nothing to do with what the lawyer actually does, or the image doesn’t mean anything at all to their web visitor.

The Home page is so cluttered, it’s distracting

The third mistake is there are just too many distractions on the website. There are a lot of ways that this can happen:

  • Using chat bots that constantly interrupt the web visitor and messing up their experience or getting in the way so they can’t find what they’re looking for.
  • Pop-ups that appear on every page, again, getting in the way of letting the web visitor find the information that they’re really seeking.
  • Big carousels with scrolling images or text that goes by so fast that you can’t even read it.
  • Poorly done video. Video is a great tool if used properly, but it can also be a distraction. Don’t post a video that will automatically play as soon as somebody comes on the website.

If you’d like to know how I can help you improve the user experience on your website, and turn your potential clients on instead of turning them off, please email me.

Watch more videos here:

Does Your Law Firm Website’s Home Page Drive Business?

Is your law firm website helping to bring you business? If not, this video is for you.

During this time of stay at home orders, with canceled events, limited or no ability to network or meet clients, prospects or referral sources in person, you my have started to recognize that your website isn’t performing as well as you would like it to. That is not likely to change even as businesses open up – now that people are used to working virtually, a lot more of your business and your networking is likely to be done online. And that makes your law firm website more important than ever.

When I talk to lawyers about their websites, especially solo and small to mid-sized firm lawyers, they often tell me that clients don’t find them on the web – that their business comes from word of mouth. But whether that is true or not – and I’d argue that it’s less true than most lawyers think it is – you can bet that a potential client or referral source is going to do an online search for you, and they will probably be checking out your website.

Three Basic Mistakes Your Law Firm Website Home Page is Making

What they find there can either actively work to help convince them that you’re the lawyer or law firm they’re looking for and get them to contact you, or not.

While not all web visitors will come to your website through the Home page, let’s start there. Here are three big, very basic mistakes lawyers make on their website home pages:

1. Doesn’t adequately orient the visitor

Studies have shown that you have only 8 seconds when a visitor first arrives on your home page to provide crucial information that orients the visitor to whether they’re in the right place. That means you need to put the most important information “above the fold” on a laptop, tablet, or desktop screen so the web visitor doesn’t have to scroll or search around to find it.

When a visitor arrives on your site, they should be able to tell in 8 seconds:

  • who you are
  • what you do – not just that you’re a lawyer, but what are your practice areas?
  • how you are different from other lawyers and why you’re the right solution for them
  • how to find the information they are looking for

2.  Firm information not easily available

I’m amazed at how many times I go to a solo or small firm lawyer’s website and can’t easily find contact information. This should also be easy to locate within the first eight seconds. In the industry, this is called NAP – name, address, phone number. Don’t make me search for your phone number! If you serve a local area, as most solo and small firm attorneys do, make sure it is easy to find your address – clients and referral sources want to know if you actually practice in their local area. If you don’t want to include your address above the fold, make sure it is easily found in the footer on every page of the site.

3. What should I do next?

Your website Home page should include a clear call to action to let web visitors know what to do next. Do you want them to download an article, contact you for a free consultation, fill out a contact form? The call to action should be clear, concise, and prominent on your Home page.

If you want to learn more about how I can help you improve your law firm’s website, please don’t hesitate to contact me.

Get More Mileage From Great Client Testimonials and Recommendations

In my last several videos, I’ve talked about client recommendations – specifically on LinkedIn, but also on other sites – we’ve covered the mechanics of asking for them, as well as the best way to ask, and also talked about what makes a great recommendation.

So what do you do after you get a great client review or recommendation? How can you get the most from it? Watch the video below, or read on to learn how.

The first thing you should always do after you get a great client review or recommendation is to say thank you! You can do it on the same platform where the client left the recommendation – by sending a thank you on LinkedIn, for example, or you can send them a thank you email or even a snail mail thank you card (hardly anyone sends those any more!)

But to really get the most out of a great client review or recommendation, when you thank the client, ask them if you can use their review or recommendation as a testimonial on your website. If you’re a lawyer or law firm, you’ll want to retain a copy of their consent, so it is best to get it in writing. Even better, ask if you can use their photo to accompany their testimonial on your website.

Testimonials are all about trust, and a website testimonial that is accompanied by a photograph of the client gives your web visitors a level of comfort that the testimonial is from a real client and isn’t just made up by you.

If you already have reviews or recommendations from clients that you haven’t added as testimonials to your law firm website, consider adding links to your reviews on other sites from your websites by saying something like, “see my other reviews on my Google Business page here.”

You can add reviews and recommendations as testimonials to your law firm website in several places – you can create a testimonials or client stories page where you collect all of your testimonials. You can also add testimonials throughout your site where it is relevant. Add testimonials that refer to a specific practice area on that practice area’s page. Put testimonials that talk about your stellar service to the page on your site that discusses how you work. Testimonials that refer to a specific lawyer in the firm can be added to the firm’s bio page.

Check out my other videos:

What Makes a Great Testimonial or Recommendation?

In my last couple of videos, I talked about LinkedIn Recommendations and testimonials – why you need them and how to ask for them.

But what makes for a good client recommendation or testimonial? Watch the video below and/or read on to find out!

The purpose of a testimonial is to help overcome client objections and to help your ideal clients to recognize themselves and see that you are a good choice for them.

You’ve probably heard testimonials on television commercials for lawyers that say something like, “I was injured in a truck accident. The insurance company only offered me $7500 to settle my case, but my attorneys got me $1 million.”

That kind of testimonial tells you what the lawyer does – plaintiff’s personal injury, but I don’t think it quite goes far enough, and it’s a little one-dimensional, focusing only on outcome.

But clients care about a lot more than outcome when they are working with an attorney. They care about what it is like to work with you, how easy you made it for them to navigate the process, whether they felt like you really cared about them and their problems, and more.

You may have also seen testimonials on lawyer websites that said something like, “Allison was great to work with on my estate plan. I highly recommend her.”

This tells you what the lawyer does and says something about the client experience, but it still doesn’t go quite far enough.

The best client testimonials tell a story about the experience – and it’s that story that the potential client reading your website will relate to. Even better would be if the testimonial demonstrates a before and after – what objections or concerns did the client have before retaining you? How did you address those concerns or objections? How does the client feel now?

You’ll want to include a number of different testimonials on your website and recommendations on LinkedIn that talk about various aspects of your service or that address the most common objections that clients have when hiring a lawyer in your practice area.

For example, look at the difference between the following two testimonials:

  1. “Mary was wonderful! She was so responsive, and we really felt that she had our best interests at heart.”
  • “Mary was invaluable in helping us through a difficult time. I was a bit skeptical at first that mediation would be able to help us resolve all of our divorce and custody issues, but Mary took the time to listen not just to what we were saying, but to dig deeper to find out what was really important to each of us and to develop a financial and custody plan that would work for our family. Mary walked us through the process and was patient, even when we got emotional during our mediation sessions. She answered our questions, no matter how trivial and found a compromise that is fair to everyone and enabled us to move on with our lives.”

A good recommendation tells a story and gives potential clients a good picture of what it is like to work with you.

As always, don’t forget to check the rules of professional responsibility in your jurisdiction to ensure that a recommendation or testimonial complies with the rules before posting it; if it doesn’t comply, you may need to ask the client for a quick revision.

For more video tips see below:

How to Ask for a LinkedIn Recommendation

 In my last video, I talked about why LinkedIn Recommendations are useful for lawyers and covered the mechanics of asking for them. But I know that some lawyers are just uncomfortable asking for recommendations. They don’t want to appear to “salesy” or to diminish their professionalism.

There are ways to approach clients for recommendations or testimonials that aren’t pushy or overly promotional. The most important thing is to be genuine. If you truly believe that you have helped this client and that you can provide value to others with the services you provide, and you approach asking for recommendations with that attitude, it may be less uncomfortable.

By far the easiest way to ask for a LinkedIn Recommendation is to do it when a client says thank you or otherwise expresses appreciation for what you have done for them. An appreciative client will always be happy to spread the word about the good work that you do.

Tell the client you were happy to help them, and then ask if they can help you reach others in a similar situation by writing a Recommendation for you on LinkedIn. You can send them a link in an email or simply tell them that you’ll send a recommendation request and that they should look out for it in their LinkedIn account.

But you don’t have to wait for a client to say thank you before you ask for a recommendation. Y ou can make recommendations a part of your regular process. Build a procedure that automatically triggers a request for a recommendation at the end of every client engagement. You can make it a part of your closing documents or email including the link and instructions, or just add to your file closing checklist to hop on LinkedIn and send that recommendation request.

If the client is an ongoing client with no specific end to their engagement, such as a client you perform outside general counsel services for, you could ask for a recommendation every so often, for example at the end of the year, at the completion of a big project, or in conjunction with a certain event every year.

Say something like, “It was a pleasure working with you. Thank you for choosing me to help you with … I have found that potential clients like to read about what it was like to work with me, so I would be grateful if you would be willing to leave a recommendation on my LinkedIn profile.” You can leave instructions right then and there about how to do so and tell them you’ll be sending a request, or wait for the client to respond that they are willing to do it and then send them a recommendation request.

As always, you’ll want to check your jurisdiction’s ethical rules with respect to recommendations and testimonials, and review any LinkedIn recommendations you receive before you post them to make sure that they do not contain prohibited language. If they do, you can always ask your client to revise the recommendation before you post it. And if your practice area doesn’t lend itself to client recommendations with a name attached, you can use these techniques to ask a client for a testimonial that you can post on your website without their name attached.

Be sure to follow up with a thank you after the client leaves you a recommendation!

For more LinkedIn video tips see below:

Should I Request a LinkedIn Recommendation?

Earlier this year I was invited to join a Zoom meeting with estate planning attorneys from all across the United States to talk about how they could use LinkedIn better. We had a great conversation that covered a wide range of topics, but one of the questions generated a significant amount of discussion, and it was a question about recommendations on LinkedIn.

Anyone you are connected to on LinkedIn can leave you a recommendation on your Profile. The lawyers  on the call generally said that they tended to pay more attention to recommendations on LinkedIn than endorsements, which they felt were not particularly valuable, and they thought their clients and referral sources might feel the same way. One of the questions that arose around this topic was whether lawyers should ask their clients for recommendations on LinkedIn, and if so, how to do that.

I think recommendations on LinkedIn are useful for a number of reasons.

A LinkedIn recommendation is like a testimonial on your own website – it’s third-party proof that you provide value for clients.

It is an opportunity for potential clients and referral sources to see what other people say about you, not just what you say about yourself and to tell their story about their experience with you.

And the way LinkedIn is set up, only your connection can write the recommendation – you can only post a recommendation on your LinkedIn Profile is if that recommendation was written by someone else. It takes a bit of time and effort for someone to write a recommendation, so it tends to have more value.

So how do you ask clients for a recommendation on LinkedIn?

First, you need to be connected to them on LinkedIn. Then you can request the recommendation in several different ways:

You can navigate to their LinkedIn Profile, scroll down to their recommendations section and click on “Request a Recommendation.”

Or, you can go to your own LinkedIn Profile, scroll down to your recommendations section and click on “Ask for a recommendation.” You’ll get a popup that will walk you through identifying who you want to ask for the recommendation and then sending the request.

You could also send an email or other request outside of LinkedIn with instructions that make it easy for them to recommend you – send them the link to your profile and tell them how to find the recommendations section. Then they can click on the “Recommend” button and write their Recommendation.

You should always carefully review any recommendations you receive on LinkedIn before you post them to your Profile to make sure that they comply with the ethics rules in your jurisdiction. If they don’t, you can always ask the client to revise it so that it does comply.

Now that you know why to request recommendations on Linkedin and how it can be done mechanically, you’re probably asking yourself (as the lawyers on the Zoom call did), “What is the best way to ask a client to recommend me on LinkedIn?” We’ll talk about that in a future video.

But for now, grab a copy of my book, Make LinkedIn Work for You on Amazon.com or check out my other LinkedIn videos:

Facing Obstacles with Community [video]

We’re all facing difficult times – we need to rely on our communities more than ever!

5 Things You’re Missing From Your LinkedIn Profile

I’ve worked with hundreds of lawyers and reviewed who knows how many lawyers’ LinkedIn Profiles, and I can tell you that most of them are missing these 5 elements:

Is your LinkedIn Profile up to the challenge?

Here are the 5 elements:

1. A header image – otherwise known as a cover photo. The header image appears at the top of your LinkedIn Profile. It is a huge missed opportunity for your personal brand. Your cover photo could include your logo or an image that reinforces your brand. You can also include your contact information in your cover photo – although it appears elsewhere on your Profile, it requires people to make an extra click. Putting it front and center makes it easier for people to contact you outside of LinkedIn. You can use a tool like Canva to create a unique cover image for your LinkedIn profile.

2. Any description of your clients. Remember – your LinkedIn Profile is about you but it isn’t for you – it’s for your target audience, whether that be potential clients, referral sources or other professionals. If I’m looking at your LinkedIn profile, will I know who you help and how? Will I be able to tell what kinds of clients I should refer to you? If I am in your target audience, will I be able to identify you as someone who can solve my problems?

3. Your story. LinkedIn may be structured like a resume, but it shouldn’t read like one. Think of your LinkedIn profile as a vehicle for telling your story and the story of your clients. Don’t just list skills and responsibilities – explain what they mean and their impact in the real world.

4. The jurisdictions where you practice. When you use LinkedIn, you are literally interacting with the world – and that means people outside of the jurisdictions where you practice may be seeing your LinkedIn Profile. Make it clear where you are admitted to practice, and in what courts. It may make it easier for people to refer business to you. Not everyone is going to click over to your website or try to find that information elsewhere. You can include these either in your About section or under Experience under your current position.

5. Any required disclaimers. Check your jurisdiction’s ethical rules  – if your jurisdiction requires disclaimers to be placed on advertisements, your LinkedIn Profile likely qualifies. You can add one to your About or Experience sections.

How did you do? Does your LinkedIn Profile contain these 5 elements?

I’m Allison Shields, President of Legal Ease Consulting, and you can find more tips on using LinkedIn in the book, Make LinkedIn Work for You, available on Amazon.com, or you can download our 47 LinkedIn tips for lawyers on my website at LawyerMeltdown.com.

Setting Goals for LinkedIn Part 2 – An Example

In my last video, I introduced the idea of setting goals for your LinkedIn use. Today I want to give you an example to show you what that might look like.

Let’s say your goal for this year is to expand your practice to represent more small businesses with their legal needs. LinkedIn can help you accomplish that in a number of ways.

  • You can search for, and join, groups containing small business owners – and then post helpful information within those groups, or answer questions posed in those groups
  • You can follow people or companies who focus on small businesses and share their posts or articles
  • You can post information and links to resources that would be helpful to small business owners
  • You can post links to information or articles on your website that would be useful to small business owners
  • You can write articles on LinkedIn that contain information helpful to small business owners
  • You can search for small businesses in your area on LinkedIn and follow the business owners and their businesses on LinkedIn
  • You can modify your Headline, About and Experience sections to highlight the work you do for small businesses
  • You can search for and connect with other professionals who work with small businesses to build referral relationships.

Then you can set specific objectives for LinkedIn related to those goals so that you actually make progress. I think this is where the difference is – making it concrete so you actually have a plan.

For example, you might want to use LinkedIn to:

  • Identify and connect with three potential new referral sources who work with small businesses a month
  • Write one article related to small business a month
  • Make one small-business related post a week
  • Identify and join three small business groups on LinkedIn and post to each of those groups once a month

When you approach LinkedIn with specific goals and related objectives in mind, you might be surprised at the results.

If you want more tips about how to maximize your use of LinkedIn, grab a copy of my book, Make LinkedIn Work for You, A Practical Guide for Lawyers and Other Legal Professionals on Amazon.com. Or check out this free download of LinkedIn tips.

47 #LinkedIn Tips for Lawyers and Other Legal Professionals

Get your copy of our 47 LinkedIn tips here – just click on the link below the image and you’ll get tips on the three building blocks of LinkedIn – Profiles, Connections and Participation.

Image of Make LInkedIn Work for You book and tablet
47 #LinkedIn Tips for Lawyers and Other Legal Professionals

Strategic Planning with the EASE Method

When I recorded this video, we were on the quick slide down to the end of the year, and now we’re already almost 3 weeks into January. Either way, the end of the old year and the beginning of the new year is a time when many of us might be thinking about planning for the year ahead. Many of the solos and small firm lawyers I know don’t do much in the way of strategic planning because they either just don’t take the time to do it, or they think it’s too complicated.

But it doesn’t have to be complicated if you use my EASE method of strategic planning.

The four steps in the EASE method of strategic planning will make your planning a breeze:

  • Envision
  • Analyze
  • Strategize, and
  • Evaluate

Envision the Result You Want

This is the first step in the EASE method – Envision what you want the end result to be. This can be as large as what your firm core values will be, or as small as a goal to increase referrals.

Analyze Where You Are Now

The next step in creating a plan is to Analyze your current situation. Take stock of where you are. This is an important part of your strategic plan – if you don’t know where you are now, you won’t know where you need to go.

So if we take our small goal of increasing referrals, you first have to take a look at your referrals now:

  • Who are your referral sources?
  • Are you getting referrals for the kind of work you want to do?
  • Where are your best clients coming from?
  • How many referrals do you receive a month?

Strategize How You’ll Get To Your Vision From Where You Are Now

After you’ve taken stock of your current position, it’s time to Strategize. Take your vision or goals and identify objectives and benchmarks that will help you reach those goals. Create action plans with specific deadlines for completion. The action plans break down your objectives into discrete steps, so that you can move toward those goals.

Getting back to our referrals example, one objective might be to improve relationships with good referral sources.

You might

  • Create a schedule for referral communications with definite dates
  • Contact three referral sources per month and schedule coffee, lunch, etc.

Evaluate and Revise

Finally, our last E in the Ease method is Evaluate and revise the plan. Planning is an ongoing process. Do your goals still make sense as time goes on? Are you meeting your objectives? Why or why not? What do you need to change about the plan?

With the EASE method: Envision, Analyze, Strategize, and Evaluate, you can develop a working strategic plan to help you reach your goals in 2020.

I’m Allison Shields from Legal EASE Consulting, wishing you happy holidays and much success in your planning for the new year!

Setting Goals for LinkedIn

It’s January, and that means you’re probably thinking about New Year’s resolutions like finally getting organized and goals for the year, like financial targets or numbers of new clients, but have you ever considered setting goals for how you use LinkedIn?

Hi, I’m Allison Shields, President of Legal Ease Consulting and one of the authors of the newly released book, Make LinkedIn Work for You, A Practical Handbook for Lawyers and other Legal Professionals.

By now, you’ve probably heard that if you’re a professional, you really need to have a LinkedIn presence; most clients, potential clients and referral sources expect you to have a LinkedIn Profile. But you may not have heard much about what to do or how to approach LinkedIn beyond that.

In the book, my co-author, Dennis Kennedy and I talk a lot about setting goals or determining a purpose for your use of LinkedIn. Dennis likes to ask the question, “What are you hiring LinkedIn to do for you?” This is a great place to start.

For most lawyers with established practices, we anticipate that the best use of LinkedIn will be to create, manage, and care for your network of referrers and potential referrers of business. But that may not be the case for everyone. Some lawyers may want to use LinkedIn as a platform to establish themselves as an expert in a specific niche. Others may use it as a tool to identify and attract candidates for employment.

If you’re still not sure exactly what you want to use LinkedIn for, think about your overall goals for the year or for your practice. How might LinkedIn help you to accomplish those goals?

In my next video, I’ll give you some specific ideas about how you can do that. But for now, if you want to learn how to use LinkedIn more effectively, you can get a copy of Make LinkedIn Work for You, A Practical Guide for Lawyers and Other Legal Professionals on Amazon.com.